Tuesday, June 30, 2009

It's all about Anticipation

Like many others I was quite shocked when I heard about MJ's death. A childhood idol is gone... Of course I'm all caught up in the MJ fever and I'm listening to his albums, watching concerts, etc.

One concert, the beginning to be precise, is a fantastic example of anticipation. But it's a non-moving anticipation, relying more on emotional anticipation maybe. But to me it's awesome to see how Jackson is nowhere to be seen and people are freaking out. Then he jumps out and people go nuts. Then for the longest time he doesn't move at all. Still, people are freaking out, because they know the show is about to start. Then he moves his head only. Again, people freak out. So awesome.


7 comments:

J Chad Erekson said...

I'm glad you pointed this out, as people talk about his animation contributions, I think you could make the case that he was almost a cartoon himself in his performances, You could pick any principle related to animation and find it in MJ's work. I was thinking silhouette for example. How he managed to keep all his dance poses/moves clear, especially in relation to the camera.

Jean-Denis Haas said...

Good point! His poses were definitely clear!

Jorge Ruiz said...

MJ forever

Andy said...

Somebody had this concert on VHS when I was growing up and I remember watching it over and over the summer of whatever year it came out.

Bernie said...

In my humble and omnipotent opinion, the audience reaction is the best! There is not only the ones who start screaming, but the ones who start making the moves with their heads and sing together like 4:51, 4:59, 7:35 and 7:49. Priceless!

Hammy said...

I came across this while surfing around.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lF89npFbn8g

Like J Chad said, every pose he did is so interesting and unique, that if you draw any of those poses it's so easy to recognize it's MJ. You really don't get any singers like this today... Cartoon Brew also have some good posts of his contribution to the animation industry.

Jean-Denis Haas said...

Oh yeah, I remember that!